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Found 27 results

  1. MO Navigation

    MO Navigation View File 5 levels I made between MO3's release and now. Submitter Markus Submitted 05/04/2018 Category CC1 Levelsets  
  2. MO Navigation

    Version 1.0.1

    14 downloads

    5 levels I made between MO3's release and now.
  3. http://cczone.invisionzone.com/files/file/649-gavind_cc2zip/Give them a try. I also made CheeseT1.dat for CC1
  4. TomB1

    Version 1.1.2

    73 downloads

    It's here. After a 3 year hiatus, TomB1.dat, known as Tom Brown's first official levelset, is finally receiving updates. It currently has 85 levels, which may be expanded at some point in the future. The levels start out with some beginner levels, and slowly gets harder as you go on. It has somewhat of a difficulty curve, so it is possible to come up on perhaps a challenging level later in the set. Some of the levels are levels that I originally created in my past, and have been modified to work in both rulesets. Most of the levels in this set are brand new and have never been created by me before 2015. All of the levels in this levelset are compatible in both rulesets, so you are able to choose which ruleset you would like to play for the levelset. Some of the levels in this levelset might be suitable for future official level packs. If you're interested in reporting scores for the set, the scoreboard can be found on pie guy's site. In other words, I guess that is all I have to say here. I hope you all enjoy it and if you have any suggestions or fixes that you want me to make, feel free to let me know on twitter, discord, and such.
  5. Top 50 Lists 2014 Deadline

    UPDATE - Deadline has now passed. Good evening, Chipsters! CC Zone now has a deadline for posting all of your top ranked 50 CC levels from each official set! Deadline - 11th September 2014 12:00AM GMT Remember to Private Message them to the CC Zone account, NOT this one! There are four top 50 lists in total: Chip's Challenge 1 Chip's Challenge Level Pack 1 Chip's Challenge Level Pack 2 Chip's Challenge Level Pack 3 Please also refer to this topic: http://cczone.invisionzone.com/index.php?/topic/1003-cc-zones-top-50-rated-levels/ on checking which levels are not allowed in specific lists.
  6. Official CCLP1 Trailer

    For solving all puzzles related to CCLP1 over the last couple of weeks, the CCLP1 staff have decided to give you one last surprise before release. Enjoy!
  7. Concept for Mobius

    Just an image to help Mobius with his concept. http://cczone.invisionzone.com/index.php?/topic/719-i-have-no-idea-how-to-build-this-concept-help/

    © Public domain

  8. decided to write a blog because I have nothing better to do. … When I was a kid (~10 years old) I had a gameboy color and my favorite console game was Mario. I played a few other games like Zelda but Mario was the only game I finished then. I often sat for hours at a time playing the same levels over and over; because the game is difficult. Later when I got very good at the game and played with friends or watched the game on youtube, I took for granted how difficult the game really is. If you play it for the first time it's not that easy. Sure its easy at the beginning but the game quickly gets difficult. I found that years later, when I was older and hadn't played the game in a long time I was unable to get as far as I thought I would. The attitudes of gamers has changed drastically since the early 90's. People don't want to play the same level 50 times over to get to the next stage anymore. Perhaps people aren't as easily entertained; either because they know that today with technology more variety is possible, or maybe it's something else. Whatever it is, I don't think that this is necessarily a good or a bad thing. It's just something that game designers need to keep in mind when they make games for today's player. A Major thing that has changed; that I personally think is a very good thing; is freedom. A lot of games today have way more freedom then they did back then. For example some developers like Valve include a "developer console" in their games. With enough knowledge you can basically make your game do all kinds of things that the designers didn't intend. You can cheat, see parts of the map you normally couldn't or create custom levels. All of this may not sound real important but what it comes down to is: letting the player have more control. Getting more replay value in the game. And in the long term; having the player take a more active role in influencing game development. Bringing the gamer closer to the designer. Now, one part of this freedom has been criticized by some gamers. And that is making games too easy. Often today there are difficulty settings or options that can potentially make the game extremely easy for a gamer. Yes, games are supposed to be a challenge. But this kind of freedom demands a responsibility on the player; to choose how he will play. Will he take the easy way out? Or challenge himself? This is a decision that I think IS ultimately the player's; no one else’s. Everybody's different. But I think there are a good number of gamers who still want a challenge and I don't see why they should let themselves be hindered by these sort of options in a game. I personally, love the challenge, and even after beating a game or level a certain way, an easy way, I often go back to see if there was something I missed, or trying and overcome whatever more difficult challenges I skipped over the first time around. I've heard people criticizing the rewind feature of Chuck's challenge. I haven't played the game yet but I can I understand their points and can agree; it makes the game too easy. But I think it's important to realize that it does so by temping the player to ABUSE the feature. Why I like this sort of feature is because it puts the player in control. It's a freedom for the player to choose how he plays the game. If he abuses a feature; that is his choice. In my personal case, I can imagine that if I'm playing a level that has an abundance of tough or irritating areas I would use the feature for a few times then simply give up and walk away. I think, if the rewind needs to be abused, it's not a good level. But I don't think it's a flaw in the game to allow this kind of playing.` Similarly in any game like this, if such features are needed to a certain extreme, the game itself is bad; not the feature. I recently tried playing Zelda 2, Adventure of Link which is a notoriously difficult game. A lot of fans love the difficulty of this game, and this style of game. But many of these gamers are those that grew up with the game; as I did with Mario and we spent hours doing the only thing we could; the only games that were available to us. Today this type of game seems really restrictive and totally inaccessible to some. On the other side of the coin, there are games that are outright too easy or don't offer a proper challenge; or enforce the easy options to an annoying degree (I think of elements in modern 3D Zelda games that Zelda fans complain about; the guides like Navi) In closing; I don't think we should be limited by our game. That fact that you can choose how you want to play your game, in my mind, is a very good thing. Well those are my shenanigans, as usual I could be a genius or a babbling idiot. That's for you to decide. Being part of 2 communities of games where custom levels are shared has taught me that very, very often, you design a level with one thing in mind and often, another entirely different thing is observed by the player, and sometimes your own idea gets thrown by the way-side. ...But that's another blog....
  9. I found Tile world through the Ubunutu software center and it works great on this Computer. Except one major problem: How do you play custom levelsets? Despite trying for a long time I can't figure out for the life of me how the Ubunutu file system works and I don't know "where" to put levelsets. Or how to get an editor working for that matter... I'm guessing that's impossible however. can anybody help me out?
  10. The Elevator Levels

    Hi everyone, just stopping by CCZone: The next level now and then, and this time I'm here to announce a future levelset I have in mind with a theme: The elevator levels. Now, don't ask me why, but lately I have been thinking of elevators (or, how Tom P would say: lifts ) And one day I had, not a brainstorm, but more like a "brain-hurricane" about ideas for elevator themed levels. I hope all of those ideas survive until the day I decide to start making this levelset, because although I'd love to start right now, I'm in a sort of "study or die" situation. But soon, I'll be spending most of my free time on this levelset. I don't know how difficult it will be, depends on my inspiration and how my level-making skills will be (if they improve or stay the same), and, most importantly, on ideas. However, since I've been already having ideas, I think it'll end up a pretty good and fun levelset. I think it'll be realesed in the late months of this year or early days of next year. I estimate it'll be in between 30 and 50 levels, I hope no fewer, because I find less than 30 a little too short. I am looking forward to finishing and sharing this levelset, I'm saying this because my other one which I keep talking about, however, doesn't proceed. About that one, I'll start talking about it again when I see that I'm really going to work on it and put effort into it because I may be getting people's hopes up, for nothing, or for something that's not going happen until a long time. I've been having personal troubles with it (such as lack of inspiration, impatience. doing something else instead of CC, etc.) so that's why it has not been advancing. So , there was a bit of stuff offtopic in that paragraph, now I'm back ontopic. The story will be something like: Chip was just about to exit the Bitbuster's building, he takes the elevator, it stops and stays stranded for some time. He waits. Nothing happens. He lays down. He stares at the ceiling, and is slowly becoming asleep, then he falls asleep, and has a long dream about the levelset, in other words, the levelset is the dream Chip has while sleeping, trapped in the elevator. The rest of the story, I haven't thought of yet, or maybe I have, or maybe,... it's a surprise? Well, there went some of the levelset infomation now, here's an interesting part; I will list some of the possibly future levels' titles: -The right floor... -Riding with other riders -A building with no elevator -A/The secret elevator -An elevator with mirrors -Freefalling elevator nightmare -Going up, going down -Destination: rooftop -Emergency exit -Get to floor 4 b4 4 (before 4 o'clock, this is probably gonna be a race-against-time level) -The need to insert a key -Jump to car #02 -Elevator music -Ding! -Elevator on fire -Shafting -Runaway elevator/(the) escaping elevator/the elevator escapes! If you have any ideas, or title names, feel free to post them! (or questions, suggestions, etc.)
  11. 10 Mazes I'd Like To See in CCLP1

    Mazes are level genres that truly have been overlooked during CCLP2 and CCLP3 voting. There are about nine in CCLP2, and CCLP3 only has four (though, depending on your interpretation of what a maze is, these numbers could be slightly greater or fewer). How many did CC1 have? Around 23. The distaste in mazes can be attributed to the fact that they don’t offer much optimization potential, and many of them are just plain monotonous. Look at CC1 and some of its most despised levels. Rink, Doublemaze, and Stripes? are all mazes. Levels like Scavenger Hunt, Chipmine, and Now You See It aren’t too exciting either. On the other hand, mazes are excellent for beginners because failure will rarely occur. Time is the only enemy. I compiled a list of what I consider 10 well-designed mazes that I would like to see in CCLP1. A-Maze-Ing Ida4.ccl #11 Remember playing Strange Maze and feeling that great sense of triumph after collecting all the chips and being able to bust open all the chip sockets? This level extends such a concept throughout the whole level, though in four separate quadrants. However, the keys that are just out of reach truly make this level interesting, and would make a wonderful level early in the set. Chip Be Steady CCLP1Submissions-KTNUSA #17 J.B. has praised this level in the past, and although I initially thought this level was nothing special, I am starting to agree with him. The “avoid the toggle button maze” is a concept that has been around for ages, but this level truly perfects it. It has the best aesthetics of levels I’ve seen of this type, and the actual maze is confined to a space small enough as to not make the level tedious. Choices, Choices pieguy1.dat #11 This choice may surprise many of you. Pieguy isn’t exactly known for his beginner-friendly levels. This level is seemingly complex, however, one must realize that all sixteen combinations that the player chooses in this level are solvable. This, while additionally being extremely impressive conceptually, adds a ton of replay value for the player. Plus, it’d be neat to have a computer generated level in an official CCLP. Elemental Park ajmiam-the-other-100-tiles #13 The four element maze is a concept explored quite often, and Elemental Park is probably the only one that has done it right. Eight chips per element, and no unintended shortcuts to be found. That teleport is an excellent touch as well. Invisibility Cloak Markus_CCLP1 #38 Here’s a word of advice – avoid invisible walls as much as possible. Blue walls and hidden walls are more reasonable, as their true identity is revealed after a simple touch. Invisible walls are often abused to hell, sometimes filling up entire levels (cough cough Stripes?), but this levels confines its invisible wall usage to a 9x9 space, and uses normal walls to guide the player. It is amazing how the addition of the invisible walls actually make the level more intriguing. Fiery Fogstorm JCCLP #48 Here is yet another acceptable use of invisible walls. Their usage, along with the usage of the fire, makes this level quite appealing to look at. While the force floor navigation could possibly be tricky for beginners, this level is wonderfully straightforward but its design choices elevate it above other mazes. Frozen Labyrinth JCCLP #37 Everyone knows that I am in love with this level, so there is no real need to go into detail. Just the sheer concept of this level is brilliant and nothing in the level is arbitrary. The fact that the thin walls and ice can combine to form a straightforward maze is incredible. Slide Labyrinth GAP’sSub.ccl #24 Very few levels seem to have a large open space with rooms arbitrarily scattered. I think it creates a unique atmosphere. Ice mazes are too often made to span the entire 32x32 map. This level cuts the ice maze in half and adds in some neat pink ball dodging rooms. Play it yourself; it’s really fun to navigate. My only qualm is the short time limit, which can easily be changed. Tunnel Clearance TS0 #11 Yes, this is my own level, but it is one that I am very proud of. It is a maze concept that to my knowledge had not been used before, coupled with symmetry and some cool aesthetics, this one belongs in CCLP1. Whirlpool JBLP1 #82 This level is quite beautiful, and uses blue walls in a wall that is sensible, i.e. not filling the entire level with them. A beginner may easily get lost, but we need higher difficulty mazes in the set too
  12. There's a thread on this forum dedicated to what we as Chip's Challenge players called certain game elements when we were younger that really intrigued me upon first glance. Some of the names given to the various monsters have been quite funny. (For instance, I didn't know that thieves have been called both "firemen" and "policemen"!) But I feel like another one should be made about the misconceptions we had concerning certain game behaviors when we first started playing. Wouldn't that be interesting? Perhaps part of my perspective stems from being only 5 years old when I first started playing the game, so reading the help file provided only limited understanding compared to engaging in actual gameplay and the experimentation that came with it. I'm assuming that's the case for most first-time players, though. I didn't understand what "following the left wall" meant for bugs - I just assumed that the game programmers somehow instilled set paths for them - nor did I understand that all grey walls were actually permanent. When I tried Nuts and Bolts for the first time, I saw the thief and the bombs above the opening area and thought that there was supposed to be some way to break through those walls to get to them! But no - the only walls that I could break through were blue, of course. Why do I bring this up? Because we've taken upon ourselves the rather awkward task of evaluating and voting on levels for a level set whose target audience is comprised of people who are the exact opposite of us veterans. These are the people who will struggle not only with understanding the game and its elements, but also with being able to control Chip to begin with. These are the people who will make the mistakes that we forgot we once made when we first started playing. These are the people who would lose patience with the game if the CCLP1 of today were constructed exactly as CC1 was, with a level like Nuts and Bolts throwing newcomers into the fire and steeply escalating the difficulty curve immediately after the tutorials. And sometimes, I think it's difficult for us to cast aside our veteran sensibilities and remember how these people feel - how we felt - upon playing the game for the first time. At the time of this post, there have been 10 voting packs (500 levels) for CCLP1 released and nearly 6,600 votes cast. Although the voting process is far from complete, I've begun noticing an interesting trend in the results - most of the top levels so far are either hodgepodge or "themed" levels with some degree of variety and (usually) moderate difficulty - though for a beginner, many of these levels would probably be fairly difficult and would fit right at home in the last quarter of CCLP1. In contrast, most of the CCLP3 top levels were those that obviously involved a lot of time and effort spent to build them, which typically meant that they were also the hardest of the bunch. A lot of these levels were also hodgepodge or themed levels as well, or at the very least, they were non-homogenous. But the irony of this penchant for non-homogeneity in individual level design was that by primarily using the voting results as the determinant for what was inducted into the final set, CCLP3 was a rather homogenous set when viewed as a collective whole. "Puzzle," "long campaign level," and "hodgepodge" would probably be the three main descriptors players would give CCLP3 if asked what kind of level best described the set. On the other hand, it's hard to nail down a specific type of level that CC1 featured a lot, mainly because the set itself had so much variety. (The same may be said of CCLP2, though some people might answer "invalid tiles" if asked that question.) So how can we avoid making the same mistake with CCLP1? Thankfully, the CCLP1 staff will be making the final decisions on what's inducted into the set and what's not for the sake of variety and the establishment of a friendly difficulty curve. I think this is important for any CCLP for the former reason, but it's especially important for CCLP1 for both reasons. But since we will be using the voting results as a guideline, we need some way to know what levels everyone enjoys besides the aforementioned hodgepodge and themed levels. If voting continues to go as is, there's going to be a huge mass of levels below the top tier that are averaging around 4.00 or so and a whole bunch of easy levels that aren't even reaching that point. So here are a few tips that I thought I'd pass on to all of you voters out there that I thought might be helpful to keep in mind when rating levels - especially when it comes to making sure easy levels get their due: - Not every level needs to be "extraordinary." It's true - the CC community of today is a very, very tough crowd to please. For the most part, we have a tendency to play and rate levels based solely on how interesting we find them. And we've seen and played so much that even our level design tendencies can often reflect this; many levels out there today try to outdo each other by trying to include just one more trick in their compositions than the last one. Again, though, there's an irony in this, especially with respect to designing for beginners. The easier levels that we often deem "boring" are most likely going to be the ones that newcomers would find interesting, whereas those that we find interesting would probably also be intriguing but sometimes frustrating for first-time players. The other major takeaway from this point ties in with the above bit about CCLP3: individually great levels do not necessarily make a collectively great set. A set composed entirely or even primarily of "epic" levels would get frustrating and repetitive after a while (in fact, some people would say that CCLP3 was exactly this), even if they weren't all difficult. Easier, smaller levels do have their place, even if they may not seem quite as engaging as the epic ones. - Try to avoid comparing apples and oranges. It's very easy for us to look at the easy, simple maze we're playing and think about the thrilling campaign level that included every game element or the level that reinvented the wheel for a familiar concept to which we awarded a 5. But why can't all three levels succeed on their own terms? While a collection of individually great levels doesn't necessarily make a collectively great set, a collectively great set is composed of individually great levels - specifically, a variety of levels that do a great job being what they were designed to be. Almost no one would say that it would be fair to compare Sampler with Four Plex from the original game; yet both of them are often praised - the former for being an excellent, simple itemswapper, and the latter for being an excellent campaign level. Is it fair to give that excellent maze a 3 just because it doesn't feel quite as thrilling as that giant hodgepodge level? For instance, I've given Chip Be Steady (Lipstick #50) a 5 out of 5 rating. It isn't a mind-blowing level that left me with a sensation of "Whoa!" when I solved it, but in the context of being a maze in which you had to avoid touching toggle buttons and a level that beginners would find inventive, it succeeded. The only other levels I'd even be thinking of when looking at it would be similar mazes in which the player isn't allowed to touch the "walls," not the campaign level with every game element included that I may also enjoy too. The reason why this one in particular stood out was because of its symmetrical "border" with the colored doors and teeth waiting to be released, which made it look a lot neater than similar levels. - When evaluating easy levels, don't look for the interesting - look for the uninteresting. Yes, you read that correctly. But it deserves a bit of clarification. The aforementioned designing tendency to outdo other levels by including more "tricks" in them is especially harmful to easy levels. As veterans, we tend to frown upon levels that feel more minimalistic - though not necessarily trivial, even for a beginner. Maybe this is because we've played the game so much that so little feels original to us anymore. We play through a level and immediately turn to one of those prepared level categories we've already created in our head so we can file it away under something like "blob level" or "ice maze." We may also turn to our preconceptions about those categories as well, some of which may be negative, even if the level would be ideal for a level set targeted at beginners. Sometimes, we may even have specific levels in mind that the ones we're playing remind us of, so much so that we're willing to discard them just because they feel like yesterday's news to us. But there's a difference between a level that's a blatant ripoff and one that does a commendable job being simple and generic, either by presenting its concept in an approachable way or by demonstrating some degree of artistic merit. Many of CC1's levels accomplished both of these objectives well. The problem with us is that we not only want to throw away these types of levels out of comparative instinct, but we also prefer easy levels that are inherently more complicated because they feel "more interesting." In many cases, these levels would be an inappropriate, muddled teaching tool for beginners and would be too uninteresting for later portions of CCLP1. Don't be afraid to give a deserving easy, generic level a good rating because it's generic and does a fantastic job being so, especially when that level excels with respect to design quality and playability. - CCLP1 may be a CC1 replacement, but it need not succumb to its shortcomings. I remember the very first time I went to a Chip's Challenge website. I was eight years old and was nearly done with the game, with the exception of "Totally Unfair." Richard Field's site had a complete walkthrough that came in very handy, but what was even more interesting than that was the collection of testimonials on the site about the game. Some of the levels that other people listed as the hardest to beat may surprise us today - levels that we as veterans find easy, such as The Last Laugh, Knot, or even Blink. It may seem unbelievable to us that they could be a challenge, but they certainly were. Another common thread from first-time players was that Nuts and Bolts presented a huge step up in difficulty from the lesson levels that preceded it. And I could totally empathize with that sentiment, as Nuts and Bolts took me an entire month to complete. Does CCLP1 need a "Nuts and Bolts" equivalent immediately following its lesson levels, or could there be some space in between to amp up the difficulty a bit before such a large level? Do we need to wait to introduce partial posting until level 138, for instance? Or is there a level simpler than Partial Post that could teach the concept in a different spot in the set? We shouldn't feel obligated to give CCLP1 all the trappings that made CC1 what it was; rather, we need to recognize what made CC1 work and avoid the areas in which it fell short while still being flexible. - Don't forget about what made you love the game when you first played it. Whenever I vote, this is the principle that I try to come back to - but it's also the one that I so often neglect. That desire to break down those walls on Nuts and Bolts is something that I forget when I play the game now. But when I think about what got me hooked on Chip's Challenge in the first place, it was that. It was that desire to break out of the box, to explore, to see what was around that next corner. In hindsight, I was so thankful that the gameplay window was only nine by nine tiles. I would spend hours trying to figure out the secret to the opening room of Paranoia while looking wistfully at the bugs roaming around in the room on the left. I didn't know what else was over there, but I was determined to find out. Sometimes, I think we now focus so much on dissecting the game, cram in as much content in as little space as possible in our levels, and find it easy to turn to the editor for a level map that we've forgotten the joy of walking around in open space, exploring that newly opened path, and remembering what made Chip's Challenge so fun to play to begin with. It's my hope that CCLP1 can recapture that sense of awe and wonder for a new generation through top-notch level design and accessible gameplay while still retaining the "challenge" part of the title that kept us coming back for more. Let's not forget about the easy levels along the way that prepare newcomers for those challenges!
  13. ZK2

    Hey guys, ZK2 is making decent progress. I'm at a mere 19 levels so far, and unsure how many levels to put in the final edition of the set. Anyways, I'll leave that for further down the road. ZK2 will have a significant increase in difficulty from my first set ZK1, with levels right from the start (no lesson levels) and some nice challenges. Here's a quick preview of level 19, "Three by Three" (sort of/kinda inspired by J.B.'s Four by Four in CCLP3). I may end up releasing a demo for this set with around 20 levels, but that'll be once the set has a good amount of levels (minimum of, oh, say 80.) With that, I'll leave you with Three by Three! -Zane/IceyLava108 Level 19, "Three by Three"
  14. Least favourite CCLP3 levels

    From what I've played, which is roughly 2/3rds of CCLP3. As of this time of posting, my least favourite CCLP3 levels are: 1. Caves - This level drove me insane as this one seemed luck based and took forever to finish, despite being short. 2. Coal Mine - Another level which drove me insane and took forever to finish, despite being somewhat easy. 3. You Can't Teach An Old Frog New Tricks - Not fun to play or finish anymore. However, it does have the frog cam. 4. Toggle Bust - Really boring. Ran out of time a few times and got me raging. 5. Lot In Life - Luck based. Similar to Caves, but not as frustrating. Be aware the list will change in the future, so some of these might drop out of the list.
  15. JBLP1

    Version 2.0.2

    459 downloads

    This set is the first in a series of MS- and Lynx-compatible level packs that I will be releasing over the next several years. The levels in these sets are meant to be simple and straightforward in the spirit of the original game, though the difficulty peak is ultimately a bit higher. There's a mix of action, puzzles, mazes, and hodgepodge levels to enjoy for players of almost any skill level. Originally, this set, JBLP1, contained 100 levels when it was released during the CCLP1 submission period. Since then, new levels have been added to take the total to a full 149. The set also features 12 tutorial levels as a preface to the challenges that lie ahead, as well as eight additional post-tutorial levels to introduce various types of gameplay. Any changes made to this set after its initial release are listed in the changelog. Changes with asterisks indicate edits that may affect TWS solutions for previous versions. Please consider the levels in this set for any future community-produced level packs. If you have any questions, comments, or suggestions, please feel free to private message me on CCZone or e-mail me at k7jbl@yahoo.com. Enjoy playing!
  16. Levels not working in Lynx

    Anyone know an easy way of finding out what's preventing a level from working in Lynx with an editor?
  17. What's the simplest way to choose levels from several sets and combine them into a new set? I recall someone throwing the idea around that an editor could have thumbnails of the levels, so the levels could be dragged around to change the level order, or copying levels between sets, but I guess this never was implemented anywhere. I guess there's no (public) tool for combining solutions from several tws files either?
  18. ChipHomeIS

    ChipHomeIS is one of my four level sets and it is born (with my other three sets: ChipHomeLP1, ChipHomeMS and ChipHomeRejcets) when I decided to divide the 149 levels (now there are less since I deleted some in order to create better quality level sets) of NMPP.dat. This level set contains the 15 insane levels I made for NMPP with harder areas and a great number of fixes. This is my favourite set between the four and I'd like to keep it always updated with fixes (if necessary) and new levels just like ChipHomeLP1. Here's a list of the levels with a few comments: 1-Chip Clone Machine: a very easy level, in which you have to chase and reach your own clone before it reaches the exit. It is based on a bug I had previously seen in TCCLPRejects' Parallel Demension (by quiznos00). 2-First in the List: this level is way harder than level 1 and introduces data reset and 32,y bug. Your main goal is to make the fireball in the main area push the blue button freeing the access to the yellow and red keys. 3-When a Thief is Needed: this levels takes the idea from a level by J.B. Lewis (JL1.dat and now also CCLP3) but it introduces a completely different layout and a data reset button. 4-Cloning Stations: this is the second and last level of this level set which is based on the 32,y bug. Just avoid the pink balls in order to proceed to further areas. 5-Just Some Bits: here come the insanity of the insanity! I actually do not know what happens but this level seems to be solvable only in certain situations and after you restarted it at least a few times. The strange situation you see in this level is caused by the instability of multiple multi tank bug which can really lead to unexpected situations! 6-Chip Desert: I created this level only to show a solvable not-busted level with the maximum number of Chips possible. It is very annoying and after solving it one time I assure you you won't come back to solve it again (by collecting 2045 Chips in one level you can easily lose your sanity)! 7-Delivery Ship: Since I spoke a lot about this level in the past I won't leave more comments here. It is a very challenging level strongly based on data reset and on the timing ability of the player. 8-The Right Tile: Using data reset you can make a tile (among the 29 possible - 3 of them are valid tiles) appear in 8,0 and change the way to solve the whole level. 9-Replacements II: Sequel to Evan Dummit's Replacements (inanity.dat) with more multi tank bug situations. 10-Moving Teleports: Having to deal with the most illogic glitch of MSCC in a logical way can be sometimes very frustrating. If you can solve this level you really know how the multiple tank glitch works (and in fact I've completely forgotten how to solve this level... I'm working on finding a new solution... ) 11-In The Right Place: The title says it all. This level relies on data reset at specific coordinates. Not a hard level but also not an easy one! 12-Data Palace: Here's another multi tank level. The first part of the level (which is the only insane part) takes its idea from a level in a set Evan Dummit's sent me by e-mail. The second part of the level does not require you to use any advance coding glitch. 13-Monsters Arena: This is a medium diffiiculty 'sane' level with some invalid tiles (i.e. tiles like 0xE7, 0xFE, Teeth - N (OR), Chip-N (AND) and so on) instead of the walls. Pay attention not to be confused by Overlay Buffers (index number 20). 14-Chased By... The Exit?: A rather funny level on the ice... in which Chip is chased by a weird exit tile! Will you be able to get the ice skates and catch the exit at the end of the level? 15-End of The Timeline: The last level of ChipHomeIS, heavily inspired by Tom P.'s Final Destination from which I took variuos ideas for a very brutal (and almost impossible) level (every idea has been revised and there's nothing just copied or edited, there are also some new ideas). The hint says Be prepared to everything! and I think this summons up this level perfectly! I think that if you can solve this level you're really a Chip's Challenge Master (I never managed to solve it). I also want to thank a lot Evan Dummit (for sending me documents and explanations on data reset and multi tank glitch), Tom P. (for creating Final Destination), J.B. Lewis (for creating To Catch a Thief), quiznos00 (for creating Parallel Demension) and the whole Chip's Challenge community. Without you I won't have succedeed in creating an insane level set like this! Thanks! This level set can be found both at CCZone Donwload Archive and Yahoo Groups! I'm also planning to create a series of AVI solutions for these 15 level and I won't give up till I'll have finished. I know there are challenging/hard levels (2,3,7,13), levels for which I have forgotten the solution (10) and levels which are... er... not so solvable (15) which can easily make me give up, but I think I can really do it (at least I should try).
  19. ChipHomeMS.dat

    Version 2012-09-02

    79 downloads

    ChipHome5's MS-compatible only level set - last update Feb/09/2011
  20. ChipHomeLP1.dat

    Version 2016-02-21

    156 downloads

    ChipHome5's main level set (all the levels in this set are Lynx-compatible) - last update Nov/22/2015
  21. ChipHomeIS.dat

    Version 2012-09-03

    273 downloads

    ChipHome5's insane levels (using data reset and multi tank glitch) - last update Mar/09/2012 Warning! Some of the levels are quite easy while some are almost impossible!
  22. The Types of Levels I Enjoy

    I was trying to come up with a list of my favorite levels, but realized that it's really hard to do because I like different levels for different reasons. There are levels I enjoy playing through quite casually, levels that are challenging to play through, levels that are great fun to optimize, and levels that take a lot of planning to solve. I'll try to explain each of these categories in more detail the reasons I enjoy those levels. I won't list examples because each category can still contain so many different types of levels, that I don't want to restrict myself to just calling out a few past favorites. And of course it would take a lot of time :-) Levels I enjoy casually These are levels that I can just play through when I have about an half hour of spare time. They don't require a lot of thinking to solve, but I still might encounter some puzzle elements. There usually is some dodging but not so many dangerous parts that I keep dying numerous times. These levels are elegant, to the point, and most often quite short. Playing these levels just makes me happy! If a set would only have this types of levels in it, I wouldn't mind at all, and it might even be one of my favorite sets. It would even have great replay value, because once I play through them once, I won't remember them completely but can go back and enjoy them again. I'm glad to see that quite a few of the new level sets have some of these levels. These are mainly the types of levels I'm hoping to find in CCLP1. Levels I enjoy playing because of the challenge These are the levels that might take several minutes to solve even when knowing the solution. They often multiple puzzles and areas, but don't get stuck in one task. To succeed in this category, the level also has to have some design elegance, and not just be a mess of convoluted tile arrangements. I need to see some design skills! Sometimes a level can have some overarching theme that tie several different puzzles together. These levels can incorporate difficult maneuvers, but they also give the player some respite from the action to think about what needs to be done next. Many of the last quarter of levels in CCLP3 fall into this category, but playing through several of them in succession is quite a task. However, for me, this doesn't take away from the fact that as individual levels they are enjoyable and well designed. Levels I enjoy optimizing The best levels to optimize are the ones where I know I've reached the maximum. Of course then someone comes along and beats the score by one second! But that's okay, because every once in a while, I get to be that person too! Finding that one nifty trick that others have missed is a great experience! Well anyway, I find that many of the levels that are enjoyable to optimize can summed up into one word: short. If a level takes longer than two minutes to play, it's very likely that optimizing it boarders on arduous. I like to work on one level for maybe an hour or two, and if by then there's still many avenues to explore, I lose interest. Even at this shorter end of the spectrum, routes can require cleverness and insight. I really like it when I understand how a level functions and why things work. I'd assume it's difficult to set out to design a level that would be great fun to optimize, but often enough this is a side product of an otherwise fun level. Levels I enjoy solving Then there are the levels that are super hard puzzles. I love these. I don't want these levels to be filled with tricky timing or extra knobs, but rather they should translate a logic puzzle into the language of Chip's Challenge. The epitome of a level in this category is one where I can print out a map of the level, stare at it for hours and then come back and complete it with one try. (Sadly enough, this has happened.) The level shouldn't be just about block pushing, but it seems to often be a major part of these levels just by the nature of the game. There's not too many of this types of levels around, but perhaps that's only a good thing, as long as there are some. It's great to find a couple of these every year, so if you can think of a tough puzzle that works nicely as a level, please share it with me! In the end it's the levels that make up this game I spend a lot of my free time on, so I'm happy to notice that there are several types of levels that I like. I need all types to get my CC fix, but not all in the same quantity. Thanks to everyone out there who has managed to create enjoyable levels for me to play! Next week I'm going talk about the things I've been up to since the new year with Chip's Challenge. -Miika
  23. Screenshots of whole levels

    What's the best program or way to get a whole view of a level on Chip's Challenge? I really want to know so I can preview my levels on CC Zone. I don't have Mapmaker anymore and it wouldn't work on a 64 bit machine. How do you guys do the screenshots like the ones in the gallery?
  24. More than 999 levels?

    Is it possible to have more than 999 levels in one set, or is this a limitation in the Chip's Challenge program/Level files? I'm not sure about Tile World by the way.
  25. Untimed Levels

    So in Chip's Challenge, do the untimed levels give you more points than the regular timed ones? For example, CCLP2 had no untimed levels I think. Does this mean the score would be lower or higher if there were untimed levels or not?
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