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The autism spectrum

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I guess if it's a "spectrum" we're all on it somewhere.

 

I'm an introvert, which sometimes makes me anti-social. My wife says I get "all peopled-out".

 

Certain odd OCD-like habits also run in my family. My dad used to check to make sure the door was locked like 6-8 times every night. My brother is always checking to make sure faucets aren't running. Me, I just chew my nails -- but if I let myself I'd be checking things constantly.

 

I also count to calm myself down -- even when I'm not angry.

 

So, is that on the spectrum?

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I guess if it's a "spectrum" we're all on it somewhere.

 

Good catch...I think.

 

I'm an introvert, which sometimes makes me anti-social. My wife says I get "all peopled-out".

 

I'm an introvert less by choice than by nature. I'd rather be social than not, but things haven't worked out that way. Lots of bad feelings left along the way...

 

 

 

Certain odd OCD-like habits also run in my family. My dad used to check to make sure the door was locked like 6-8 times every night. My brother is always checking to make sure faucets aren't running. Me, I just chew my nails -- but if I let myself I'd be checking things constantly.

 

I'm not really OCD (although I can't stop from biting my nails/hands), which is one of the things that makes me question whether autism's really an actual state, or if it's just a bunch of loose categories that therapists like to throw at people to make their own jobs easier.

 

 

 

So, is that on the spectrum?

 

http://rdos.net/eng/Aspie-quiz.php

 

No idea how reliable it is, but my results were:

 

Your Aspie score: 114 of 200

Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 69 of 200

You are very likely an Aspie

 

 

...of course, this is no substitute for a professional's opinion (not that one should necessarily place much stock in those, cough cough).

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Well then:

Your Aspie score: 98 of 200

Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 93 of 200

You seem to have both Aspie and neurotypical traits

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That was quite interesting! Thanks for sharing.

 

Your Aspie score: 43 of 200

Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 140 of 200

You are very likely neurotypical

 

Does this mean I'm not crazy?

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Your Aspie score: 77 of 200

Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 147 of 200

You are very likely neurotypical

 

Interesting. My parents were always curious about whether I had Asperger's when I was a kid. I don't really identify with being neurotypical, though, at least in terms of the social aspect. I can function in social situations, I just find socializing a lot less interesting than most people do (introvert by choice <3).

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The funny thing is, no one suspected it when I was a kid. I was almost 21 by the time I was diagnosed.

 

I used to try to convince myself that I was an introvert by choice, but now I'm not so sure. Anyway, it probably is a lot easier being introverted, whether you choose that path or not...

 

Are other people interesting? It really depends. I think traditional modes of conversation are boring, whereas relatively unorthodox discourse can be quite fascinating. Shame most people seem to be more interested in the former...

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Your Aspie score: 81 of 200

Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 131 of 200

You are very likely neurotypical.

 

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I always find it amusing trying to explain to extroverts how I just don't find social situations inherently exciting, since most of them react like they can't fathom the very concept. Like, if a friend phones me up and says "hey, want to join me, X, Y, and Z? we're going downtown", my initial reaction is not :) but rather <_< at the thought of having to do the following:

 

1) Ride public transit for 1 hour while making pointless small talk

2) Walk around downtown for 1 hour while still talking about nothing interesting

3) Eat dinner for 1 hour while continuing to talk nothing about nothing

4) Walk around downtown for another hour while nothing talking nothing about nothing

5) Ride public transit back for yet another hour while nothing nothing nothing nothing nothing

 

More likely than not, if I accept, I get back to my house at the end of it all wishing I hadn't wasted 5 hours of my life (and some $) that I could have spent doing something actually enjoyable. Socializing is only enjoyable to me if I really enjoy being with the people involved, or we're doing/talking about something fun/important (which are all narrow categories). To anybody who has ever impatiently tapped their foot while waiting for something to get over with, that's my mental state whenever I socialize for the sole sake of socializing. Next time, I'm declining your invitation and getting back to my anime marathon / poker session / impromptu nap / etc. and feeling great about it.

 

/rant that I needed to get off my chest...I've met autistic people who feel the same way about social interaction, which I think is interesting and explains some of what I meant in my previous post.

 

Edit - also, practically none of this post applies to online interaction at all.

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Yeah, it wasn't my intention to try and claim Asperger's. I don't meet nearly enough of the necessary criteria. That particular introverted perspective does seem to be common among those that do legitimately have it, though, although that's just based on my own personal experiences with those who are autistic, and that's hardly a sample size large enough to draw serious conclusions from.

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Oh. Upon further inspection of the pdf thing, it would appear that I have mild ADD or something like that.

Wonderful.

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my initial reaction is not :) but rather <_< at the thought of having to do the following:

 

1) Ride public transit for 1 hour while making pointless small talk

2) Walk around downtown for 1 hour while still talking about nothing interesting

3) Eat dinner for 1 hour while continuing to talk nothing about nothing

4) Walk around downtown for another hour while nothing talking nothing about nothing

5) Ride public transit back for yet another hour while nothing nothing nothing nothing nothing

 

This post made me laugh, mainly because it's so true! It's weird how social situations are rarely (never) as exciting as you might imagine them to be. I can completely understand why you'd give up on the whole concept.

 

"Small talk" is a terrible concept. The Native Americans had the right idea; don't say anything unless you have anything to say! Sadly, most people in Western cultures lack this sort of discipline.

 

(That said, I love public transit. Joyriding on the bus was one of the small pleasures of my teenaged life. Maybe it'd have been different were I forced to make small talk.)

 

 

More likely than not, if I accept, I get back to my house at the end of it all wishing I hadn't wasted 5 hours of my life (and some $) that I could have spent doing something actually enjoyable.

 

What do you find enjoyable?

 

 

 

also, practically none of this post applies to online interaction at all.

 

7a416d1ec2510a77145b032f0a6be7fa56d23c40.gif7a416d1ec2510a77145b032f0a6be7fa56d23c40.gif7a416d1ec2510a77145b032f0a6be7fa56d23c40.gif

 

 

 

 

I don't need to take that quiz. I am who I am! (Y)

 

It's true that autism is just another label...but then, knowing what you have can help you deal with those facets of your personality that might be seen as "odd" or otherwise unorthodox...or so I've been told.

 

 

 

 

Oh. Upon further inspection of the pdf thing, it would appear that I have mild ADD or something like that.

Wonderful.

 

Honestly, I seriously doubt that anyone who completed that quiz could have ADD. I don't have ADD, and yet I still grew impatient taking it. :)

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Your Aspie score: 45 of 200

Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 169 of 200

You are very likely neurotypical

 

That's nice.

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Din Aspie poäng : 88 av 200

Din neurotypiska (icke-autistiska) poäng: 137 av 200

Stor sannolikhet att du är neurotypisk

 

Interesting site!

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Well, not that this thread should be just about the quiz, but taking it isn't going to change who you are...

 

Edit - it isn't meant to tell you who you are, either.

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^Well, again, remember that you can have a label attached to you and still be who you are. :)

However, there is a dark side of being labeled autistic. I feel that I internalized the label as a negative trait when I was younger and thus limited my potential, and that autism became a crutch for me when things went wrong or life was too hard, even an excuse to behave badly and/or give up. The best solution, I find, is to work at progress, publicly discuss struggle and progress, and inspire others still living with autism and even other disabilities; I realized how valuable my testimony was in recent times, and this makes me less of an "autistic person" than a "person with autism," a distinction made in last night's anthropology class that makes all the difference in our self-image. The things that drive us to transcend ASD are important to know and appreciate in order to land on the positive side of the fence; for me, they are my friends, family, faith, instructors, appreciation for the finer things in life, and knowledge that my story does impact people. We should be aware of who we are as autistics, but not letting autism define us, rather to let what we make of it define us.

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^That was a really good post, ManipulatorGeneral. Autism's definitely not an excuse for poor behaviour (and I know I've fallen into that trap, unfortunately). On the flip side, as you said, it's important to recognize it so that you can build off of that knowledge (rather than letting it strangle you). That's why I think it's probably a good thing to know where you stand on the spectrum, even if you think that it's just a label. That it may be, but there are implications that you can use to your advantage...

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Well, not that this thread should be just about the quiz, but taking it isn't going to change who you are...

 

Edit - it isn't meant to tell you who you are, either.

 

Look I just don't want to take the quiz. Is that really a problem?

 

Geez people stop fricking harping on me over 1 fricking thing.

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One symptom of Asperger's is obsession, I believe. LOL

 

I think it's important to distinguish what affects you and who you are. The two are intertwined, but distinct.

 

It's also important not to try to be something you're not. Challenging yourself is good. Expecting to succeed at every challenge is unrealistic.

 

I'm also wondering how much diet has to do with mental health. I know I act differently when I eat poorly.

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Look I just don't want to take the quiz. Is that really a problem?

 

Geez people stop fricking harping on me over 1 fricking thing.

 

Yes, it's a problem. The universe will implode if you don't take the quiz in the next 6 hours. Do you really want that to happen?

 

 

Nobody was harping on you, just expressing disagreement with why you said you weren't taking it. Don't take the quiz if you don't want to. Taking the quiz was interesting to me because, from the questions and the results analysis file they give you afterwards, you can infer what it's like to have Asperger's/Autism. I found the results mildly interesting as well, but they need to be taken with a grain of salt and they need never to cause you to alter who you are (in fact, it should be the reverse; the "correct" approach IMO is "my [personality/political views/sexual orientation/etc.] can be described [poorly/somewhat/well/very well/etc.] by X" rather than "X is who I am, I must be ___ because that's one quality of X, I need to try harder to be X", etc.)

 

This next spoiler might come off the wrong way, but I think it can be turned into a thread contribution:

From a psychological standpoint, it's interesting that you got immediately and explosively defensive about this. I'm wondering if this is a defensive mechanism people have to help them avoid even considering the possibility of harm to their self-image (especially when "problems" like autism are the "harm" being considered).

 

 

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I got defensive about it because my brother is autistic. And just because I refuse to take it, doesn't mean I have a problem. I just choose not to take it...but if the world depends on it, then fine I'll take it.

 

Also, getting defensive like that is how my personality is. It's also how I was raised. My apologies.

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You have nothing to apologize for. Also, since I get the impression your brother's autism is serious, sorry to hear that. Maybe you'd be able to give us some insight, though, for those of us that can't really relate.

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You have nothing to apologize for. Also, since I get the impression your brother's autism is serious, sorry to hear that. Maybe you'd be able to give us some insight, though, for those of us that can't really relate.

 

How can I give insight? Like information about it?

 

His autism is serious. But his is really hard to explain really...it's just not as bad as you may think it is. One thing is he has speech problems (if you watch his CCLP3 videos you'll see) and he tends to run around randomly and shakes his hands. He also asks questions he knows the answer to a lot. Other than that, he is really smart and amazing at figuring out puzzles, which is why he plays CC a lot and he also is really great at fixing electrical appliances for I have no idea why but he is (Y)

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Socializing is only enjoyable to me if I really enjoy being with the people involved, or we're doing/talking about something fun/important (which are all narrow categories). To anybody who has ever impatiently tapped their foot while waiting for something to get over with, that's my mental state whenever I socialize for the sole sake of socializing.

^this

 

http://xkcd.com/602/

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I have an AS diagnosis (as well as ADHD and OCD diagnoses), but here's what that website said. It is exactly what I expected:

 

Your Aspie score: 109 of 200

Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 105 of 200

You seem to have both Aspie and neurotypical traits

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Your Aspie score: 98 of 200

Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 117 of 200

You seem to have both Aspie and neurotypical traits

 

Here's a few "aspie" questions I answered 2/2 to, and I feel these are the most accurate about me, by far:

  • As a child, was your play more directed towards, for example, sorting, building, investigating or taking things apart than towards social games with

other kids?

  • Do you or others think that you have unconventional ways of solving problems?
  • Do you feel an urge to correct people with accurate facts, numbers, spelling, grammar etc., when they get something wrong?
  • Do you need to do things yourself in order to remember them?
  • Are you easily distracted?
  • Do you find it very hard to learn things that you are not interested in?
  • Is your sense of humor different from mainstream or considered odd?
  • Do you get very tired after socializing, and need to regenerate alone?
  • Do you often have lots of thoughts that you find hard to verbalize?
  • Do you find it difficult to figure out how to behave in various situations?
  • Do you tend to shut down or have a meltdown when stressed or overwhelmed?

Growing up, I spent most of my younger years online playing checkers/chess/reversi/go-moku building lego, memorizing songs on the back of CDs and how long the songs were, every lyric etc., but also doing outdoor activities (climbing trees, exploring, wanting to race people, I had/slightly have an obsession with running and a lust for competition -- even though these activities were done with people, I would typically venture off by myself) Overall, I'm not your typical introvert. I'm more of am ambivert, which is in between - although I am more on the introverted side. I get random bursts of energy where I need to be around people. I get bored of what I'm doing frequently and need to be around people, usually those whom I'm comfortable around though. I'm not awkward at all, I can really put on a good facade and seem really REALLY social. Other times, I hardly talk and just feel like recharging my battery with my PC. Also, when talking to people, it really frustrates me to no end when I'm doing all the talking and they're listening and not giving a stimulating input. I also have a large tendency to act on impulse, i.e, I didn't even bother editing this post or re-reading it before I posted it. Oh, and one more thing: I really thrive and am at my happiest/best when I make goals/get inspired from something. That stuff just makes me go woohoo!

 

woohoo

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 He is really smart and amazing at figuring out puzzles, which is why he plays CC a lot and he also is really great at fixing electrical appliances for I have no idea why but he is (Y)

That's basically me in a nutshell. :P

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Nice bump.

 

Michael you should try programming sometime. I think you would excel amazingly at it.  ;)

Also, I think I should take the Aspie quiz again because I've changed so much since last year when this thread was actually a thing.

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This was interesting. I have to agree with some of the things James said, but not totally. And I have to answer yes to quite a few of the questions in Andrew Gee's post.

I used to have friends that were not interesting but I finally said enough is enough and we're not friends anymore.

While I think I definitely had Aspergers syndrome when I was little (if I don't still have it, I've change a lot) or something similar to it, and I get easily tired of social situations, I do like them occasionally. If they feel really tedious I don't think it's worth it. I think some people be together because they feel they have to for some reason—when they don't. I hate talking to someone who is clearly uncomfortable-- it makes me uncomfortable as well.

 

I think some of the best things in life are witnessing amazing art/performances, something beautiful in nature, and “horsing around” with your friends. :lol:

[horsing around being; sitting in some random restaurant late at night, telling jokes or ridiculous stories or thinking of crazy scenarios, or engaging in other “tomfoolery” which is not necessarily constructive (though often is)]

 

I've never been competitive in the least, and frankly it may sound strange but I really have a difficult time understanding competition at all sometimes.

 

I haven't taken the quiz because I'm too lazy and my internet connection is slow. :P

 

and is it a coincidence that so many chips challenge enthusiasts are/were autistic?

 

any of you read that book: "The Reason I Jump" ?  Written by a young autistic Japanese boy, it was talked about on the Daily Show last week.

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I think I definitely had Aspergers syndrome when I was little (if I don't still have it, I've change a lot)

As far as i know, Asperger's syndrome (and autism in general) never goes away, and there's no cure for it. You can improve yourself and overcome it, but you'll always have the disorder.

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